Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Honey - Camera di Commercio di Macerata

Millefiori honey

Description

Millefiori in Italian means "thousand flowers". The bees that made this honey pollinated in a region where there were many varities of flowers, giving it it's complex, floral taste. The texture of the honey itself it thick and grainy.  This is both the most common type of honey and also the rarest: made of nectars from flowers in a particular place at a particular time, it is essentially impossible to reproduce its unique color, aroma and flavors from year to year.

·        Colour: straw/amber

·        Flavour: subtle, delicate

·        Characteristics: runny at extraction, crystallizes spontaneously in late summer and autumn.

·        Recommended use: for breakfast, morning and afternoon tea or just snacking, it is a great compliment to fresh cheeses.

Oak honeydew

Description

Honeydew honey or Forest honey is a type of honey made—not from blossom nectar—but from honeydew excreted by plant sucking insects such as aphids. It is usually produced from trees, both conifers and deciduous, although it may also be produced from grasses and plants. The ancient Roman naturalist Pliny thought honeydew fell from the stars and this belief was held for centuries. 

- Colour: Dark to very dark, honey colored, sometimes with green fluorescence.

- Aroma: Woody and warm.

- Flavour:  medium intensity of cooked fruit and of malt.

- Taste: medium, woody and warm intensity. Medium sweetness with weak acidity. No bitterness with a medium aroma. Medium persistence/aftertaste and sometimes astringent.

- Characteristics: remains liquid for long periods, very dense.

- Recommended use: as this is a honey rich in mineral salts it is highly recommended for sports people and is very good on pastries.  

 

Phacelia honey

Description

Phacelia honey is a   high quality product,  white or light green color , is characterized by a delicate aroma and a delicate , slightly tart , pleasant taste. Its high value is due not only to taste ( often on the grounds of his equate to linden honey ), but also the fact that it slowly crystallized. This feature allows a particular success using it for winter feeding bees. Crystallized honey is a sticky , doughy mass .

Heather honey

Description

Heather honey is a highly valued product in moorland and heathland areas, with many beehives being moved there in late summer. Not always as valued as it is today, it was dismissed as mel improbum by Dioscurides. Heather honey has a characteristic strong taste, and an unusual texture, for it is thixotropic, being a jelly until stirred, when it becomes a syrup like other honey, but then sets again to a jelly. This makes the extraction of the honey from the comb difficult, and it is therefore often sold as comb honey.

Colour:  tending towards orange.

Flavour:  fresh floral aroma, delicate, with a wonderful aftertaste.

Characteristics: crystallizes rapidly.

Recommended use: great table honey and doesn’t cloud herbal teas.

Eucaliptus honey

Description

The honey is really good with a very particular flavour and taste, at the beginning too bitter, but then step by step it will be easy to appreciate it and its properties. Generally it's crystallizing in a compact way. Light amber colour with special smell and long flavour. It can be used for a lot of domestic needs, also to treat the cold. Into kitchen it's used to prepare aromatic, sweet and sour sauces.

Colour:  from dark amber to grey.

Flavour:  intense and persistent.

Characteristics: crystallizes quickly.

Recommended use: excellent accompaniment to cheeses, pastries and herbal teas.

Acacia honey

Description

Acacia honey is an excellent product with sweet, light and delicate flavour and a wonderful light colour.This honey doesn't crystallized too much, while it's always available liquid. It's produced into the wood near Arezzo and then prepared into the company. The colour is water white. It's perfect to be combined with cheeses, especially pecorino cheese, but also as sweetener for milk, coffee or tea and infusion too. As for popular pharmacopoeia this honey contains detoxicating properties for liver and anti-inflammatory properties for throat.

Colour: clear

Flavour: light, delicate, vanilla, floral

Characteristics: remains liquefied for long periods

Recommended use: excellent for sweetening without altering the taste or the aroma of drinks. Marvellous for children.  It is a great compliment to fresh ricotta cheese.

 

Stachys honey

Description

Stachys honey  is a fine and rare honey. Its presence on the market depends on the territory where it is produced and on the farming cycles. This honey is produced only in the Marche region and in the east Umbria and it is the result of the processing of the Stachis Officinalis nectar made by bees. The “Stachis Officinalis” is a spontaneus weed which growths after the harvesting season. Stachys honey is characterized by a bright colour and a very sweet taste. Higly recommended with tea and herb tea.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honey flans

Ingredients

 

1/2 cup sugar 

7 tablespoons honey (such as orange blossom), divided

1 (14-oz.) can sweetened condensed milk 

1 cup milk 

3 large eggs 

1 large egg yolk 

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 


Preparation

 

1. Preheat oven to 180°. Sprinkle sugar in a 3-qt. saucepan; place over medium heat, and cook, gently shaking pan, 4 minutes or until sugar melts and turns a light golden brown. Slowly stir in 3 Tbsp. honey. (Mixture will clump a little; gently stir just until melted.) Remove from heat; immediately pour hot caramelized sugar into 6 (6-oz.) ramekins.

2. Process condensed milk, next 4 ingredients, and remaining 4 Tbsp. honey in a blender 10 to 15 seconds or until smooth; pour evenly over sugar in each ramekin. Place ramekins in a 13- x 9-inch pan. Add hot tap water to pan to a depth of 1 inch. Cover loosely with aluminum foil.

3. Bake at 180° for 30 to 35 minutes or until slightly set. (Flan will jiggle when pan is shaken.) Remove ramekins from water bath; place on a wire rack. Cool 30 minutes. Cover and chill 3 hours. Run a knife around edges of flans to loosen; invert flans onto a serving plate.

 

Lime-Honey Glazed Chicken

INGREDIENTS


 

·         6 tablespoons honey

·         6 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce

·         2 teaspoons freshly grated lime zest

·         6 tablespoons lime juice

·         1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

·         4 6-ounce bone-in chicken thighs, skin and excess fat removed

·         2 12-ounce bone-in chicken breasts, skin and excess fat removed, cut in half crosswise


PREPARATION

 

1.     Mix honey, soy sauce, lime zest, lime juice and crushed red pepper in a large bowl. Add chicken pieces; stir to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.

2.     About 20 minutes before you are ready to grill, preheat a gas grill (with all burners lit) to 200°C or build a fire in a charcoal grill and let it burn down to medium heat (about 200°C).

3.     If using a gas grill, turn off one burner (leaving 1 to 2 burners lit, depending on your grill). If using a charcoal grill, move the coals to one side. Remove the chicken pieces from the marinade (reserve marinade) and place bone-side down (with the thick part of the meat facing up) on the unheated side of the grill rack. Close the lid and roast undisturbed for 25 minutes.

4.     Meanwhile, place the marinade in a small saucepan over medium-high heat and boil until reduced by about half and thickened to a glaze, 8 to 10 minutes.

5.     Rotate the chicken to other spots on the unheated portion of the grill to ensure even cooking and lightly brush with some of the glaze. Cover and continue roasting, basting once more about halfway through cooking, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center of the meat without touching bone registers 165°F, 10 to 20 minutes more.

 

 

Granola

INGREDIENTS


 

·         6 cups old-fashioned rolled oats

·         1 cup chopped almonds

·         1 cup chopped walnuts

·         1 cup raw, unsalted pepitas (see Tip)

·         1/2 cup maple syrup

·         6 tablespoons canola oil

·         1/4 cup honey

·         1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

·         1 teaspoon vanilla extract

·         1/2 teaspoon salt


 

 

PREPARATION

 

1.     Preheat oven to 16C. Line a roasting pan or large baking sheet with parchment paper.

2.     Combine oats, almonds, walnuts and pepitas in a large bowl. Whisk maple syrup, oil, honey, cinnamon, vanilla and salt in a medium bowl until blended. Pour over the oat mixture and toss to coat. Spread the mixture in the prepared pan.

3.     Bake, stirring every 15 minutes, until lightly and evenly browned and starting to dry out, 50 minutes to 1 hour. Let cool completely in the pan before serving or storing.

 

 HONEY, ANISE AND ALMOND BISCOTTI

 

INGREDIENTS

·         2 cups all purpose flour

·         1 teaspoon baking powder

·         1/2 teaspoon baking soda

·         1/2 teaspoon salt

·         1/2 cup vegetable oil

·         1/2 cup sugar

·         1/2 cup honey

·         2 large eggs

·         2 teaspoons grated lemon peel

·         2 teaspoons aniseed, crushed

·         1 teaspoon vanilla extract

·         1 1/2 cups slivered almonds (about 6 ounces), lightly toasted


PREPARATION

Whisk first 4 ingredients in medium bowl to blend. Whisk oil, sugar, honey, eggs, lemon peel, aniseed and vanilla in large bowl until smooth. Stir in flour mixture, then nuts. Cover and refrigerate dough until well chilled, about 3 hours.

Preheat oven to 18C. Butter and flour 2 large baking sheets. Spoon out dough in 3 equal strips (2 on one sheet, spaced well apart, and 1 on second sheet). Using well-floured hands, shape strips into 2-inch-wide by 1-inch-high logs.

Bake logs until just springy to touch, switching and turning pans after 10 minutes, about 20 minutes total (logs will spread). Cool 15 minutes on sheets. Maintain oven temperature.

Using large spatula, gently transfer logs to work surface. Using serrated knife, cut each log on diagonal into §-inch-thick slices. Arrange slices, cut side down, on baking sheets. Bake until bottom side browns, about 7 minutes. Turn cookies over. Bake until bottom side browns, about 7 minutes longer. Transfer to racks and cool (cookies will crisp as they cool). (Can be made 2 weeks ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.)

 

Pumpkin honey bread

Ingredients


·         1 cup - honey

·         1/2 cup - butter or margarine, softened

·         1 can (16 oz.) - solid-pack pumpkin

·         4 - eggs

·         4 cups - flour

·         4 teaspoons - baking powder

·         2 teaspoons - ground cinnamon

·         2 teaspoons - ground ginger

·         1 teaspoon - baking soda

·         1 teaspoon - salt

·         1 teaspoon - ground nutmeg


Directions

 

In a large bowl, cream honey with butter until light and fluffy. Stir in pumpkin. Beat in eggs, one at a time, until thoroughly incorporated. Sift together remaining ingredients. Stir into pumpkin mixture. Divide batter equally between two well-greased 9 x5 x 3-inch loaf pans. Bake at 18C for 1 hour or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Let loaves cool in pans for 10 minutes; invert pans to remove loaves and allow to finish cooling on racks.

Orange Polentina

INGREDIENTS

 

·         1 medium orange

·         2 cups water

·         1 1/2 cups low-fat milk

·         1/4 teaspoon salt

·         3/4 cup instant polenta or fine cornmeal

·         1/4 cup mascarpone (Italian cream cheese)

·         1/4 cup nonfat Greek-style yogurt

·         4 tablespoons honey, divided

·         1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh tarragon (optional)

 

PREPARATION

 

1.     Zest the orange to get 1 1/2 teaspoons; set the zest aside. Remove the rest of the peel and white pith with a sharp knife. Working over a bowl, cut the segments from their surrounding membranes. Set aside for garnish.

2.     Combine water, milk and salt in a large heavy saucepan and bring to a boil. Gradually whisk in polenta (or cornmeal) and return to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low to maintain an even bubble and whisk until the polentina thickens, 1 to 5 minutes (depending on what type you’re using). Remove from the heat, cover and let stand for 5 minutes.

3.     Meanwhile, combine mascarpone, yogurt, 1 tablespoon honey and 1/2 teaspoon of the orange zest in a small bowl.

4.     Whisk the remaining 3 tablespoons honey and the remaining 1 teaspoon zest into the polentina. Divide among 4 bowls and top with a dollop of the mascarpone topping. Garnish with the reserved orange segments and sprinkle with tarragon, if desired. Serve immediately.

 

 

Struffoli

 

Ingredients


For the Dough
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon sugar
Zest of half a lemon, grated
Zest of half an orange, grated
pinch salt
4 large eggs
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 teaspoon grappa, rum, or vanill
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For the Honey Syrup
2 cups honey
½ cup sugar
⅓ cup water
¼ cup small colored sprinkles


 

Directions

Stir the flour, sugar, lemon and orange zest and salt together in a bowl and turn it out onto a clean work surface. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the eggs, butter and grappa to it. With your fingertips, work the eggs, butter and grappa together until more or less blended, then begin working in the dry ingredients. Continue working the dough until it is smooth and evenly blended. Gather the dough together into a ball, wipe the dough from your hands and add it to the dough ball. Clean your hands and the work surface, flour both lightly and knead the dough until smooth, 3 to 4 minutes. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature 1 hour.

Pull off a plum size piece of the dough and roll it out with your palms and fingers to a rope about 1/3 inch in diameter. Repeat with the remaining dough. Cut the dough ropes crosswise into 1/3-inch lengths. Roll the pieces of dough between your hands into balls.

Pour the oil into a wide, deep skillet or braising pan and heat over medium heat until a deep frying thermometer registers 180 degrees C or a dough ball gives off a lively sizzle when slipped into the oil. Carefully slide about one-fourth of the dough balls into the oil and fry, turning and immersing them with a wire skimmer or slotted spoon, until golden brown on all sides, about 4 minutes. Transfer them with the skimmer to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain, first allowing any excess oil to drip back into the pan. Repeat with the remaining dough balls, allowing the oil to return to the correct temperature before frying the next batch.                                            
Have a bowl of cold water and a serving plate large enough to hold the finished struffoli (about 12 inches in diameter) close by. Stir the honey, sugar and water together in a heavy wide pot large enough to hold all the dough balls over low heat until the sugar is dissolved. Increase the heat to high and bring the syrup to a boil. The syrup will foam up dramatically when it comes to a boil. Continue cooking until the foam dies down and the mixture becomes just a shade darker [ok?], about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and immediately add all the fried dough balls. Toss them in the syrup with a wire skimmer until they are coated. Remove the dough balls from the syrup with the skimmer, allowing excess syrup to drip back into the pan first, and mound them on the serving plate like a pyramid, helping yourself with your hands from time to time, after dipping them into the cold water to protect them.
                                
Scatter the sprinkles over the mound of struffoli until it is colorful. You may serve them the same day, however it also keeps well for several days covered loosely with plastic wrap.

 

 

Honey and health. Honey offers many medicinal uses described in traditional medicine, in addition to just commonly being used as a sweetener. The composition of honey varies depending on the floral source, seasonal and environmental factors, as well as processing techniques used. Honey is rich in phenolic acids and flavonoids, and exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities. It has been hypothesized that honey contributes to the reduction in cardiovascular diseases mainly due to flavonoid-mediated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and antimicrobial activities. The consumption of natural honey has been shown to inhibit oxidation of low density protein, vasodialate blood vessels due to nitric oxide production, decrease platelet aggregation, and exert analgesic and anti-atherogenic effects; each of which may decrease cardiovascular risk. This overview explores the potential therapeutic role of honey in treating cardiovascular diseases, mainly focusing on its potential molecular mechanism(s) underlying flavonoid-mediated actions that may be cardioprotective. However, well designed, double blind, clinical trials on a large scale are needed to confirm therapeutic efficacy of honey in humans.

Millefiori honey

Well being

The antibacterial action of honey is thought to be from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). A powerful antimicrobial, H2O2 can kill nearly all germs, as well as some cancer cells, on contact. When honey comes in contact with a wound, an enzyme called glucose oxidase—a gift from the bees—activates the release of H2O2. There are likely undiscovered interactions that occur when honey is used to treat wounds, but from what we know, medicinal honey can even kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria like MRSA.

Honey is hydroscopic. It pulls water away from an infected wound by osmosis. Dryer wounds heal faster. But there’s more to it: honey also pulls lymph fluid to the wound, making for a balanced healing environment.

It also has a low pH of between 3 and 4, making it acidic. Bacteria thrive in neutral or slightly alkaline environments.

Raw Millefiori honey is rich in both amount and variety of antioxidant substances, and its inclusion in the diet may be recommended to complement other polyphenol sources.


Oak honeydew

Wellbeing

 In general, with respect to blossom honey, honeydew honey is higher in minerals and amino acids as well as in higher molecular weight sugars (oligosaccharides), in particular, melezitose and raffinose. Oligosaccharides are prebiotics that have a beneficial effect on bacteria in the digestive system. It tends to be darker, less sweet, less acidic and resists crystallization when compared to honey. Honeydew honey has higher electrical conductivity and ash content and tends to remain liquid and resist crystallization because of high fructose and low glucose levels, as well as a low glucose to water ratio. There has been some research that indicates that honeydew honey also has higher than average antibiotic properties due to higher levels of Glucose Oxidase which leads to the production of Hydrogen Peroxide.

Phacelia honey

Well being

Phacelia honey primarily used as a dietary product for liver and stomach, nausea , heartburn, gastritis with low acidity. For example, in the case of dysbacteriosis during the day eat 80 g honey , which eliminates inflammation in the intestine to relieve pain. In diseases of the stomach honey mixed with aloe juice and walnuts will help you to feel better.

 

Heather honey

Well being

First and foremost, being a sugar, raw honey most obviously offers a quick source of energy. While this came in very handy to early humans that used this food source, it is more of a drawback to us today, living in a culture of abundant calories. The main health benefits for which we revere raw honey today come from the unique blend of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, antioxidants, phytonutrients and other health components that it possesses. The two key beneficial components of truly raw honey are bee pollen and propolis. Bee pollen is a super nutritious compound, containing all the nutrients required by the human body. It is a source of proteins, vitamins, minerals, beneficial fatty acids, carotenoids and bioflavonoids which are antiviral, antibacterial and helpful to cardiovascular health. Propolis also has antibacterial and antiviral qualities, as well as antifungal, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This, along with some of its other characteristics, makes honey highly sought after. The health benefits and uses—both internal and external—of propolis are too numerous to be listed here

Eucaliptus honey

Well being

The health benefits of the eucalyptus honey are many - anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, decongestant, deodorant, antiseptic, antibacterial, and stimulating. In fact I first started reading up Eucalyptus honey after a salesman tried to sell his bottles of Eucalyptus honey at a fleamarket and taught me how to use it as an expectorant for mild coughs and colds. Besides being a good natural remedy for respiratory problems, Eucalyptus honey is a good antiseptic owing to its germicidal properties. On its exposure to air, ozone is formed which is a well-known antiseptic. Hence Eucalyptus honey is used for healing wounds, ulcers, burns, cuts, abrasions and sores. It is also effective on insect bites and stings. It is often recommended to patients suffering from rheumatism,lumbago, sprained ligaments and tendons, stiff muscles, aches, fibrosis and even nerve pain. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory Eucalyptus honey is massaged on the skin surface in circular motion to help relieve muscle and joint pains.

 

Acacia honey

Well being

The antibacterial action of honey is thought to be from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). A powerful antimicrobial, H2O2 can kill nearly all germs, as well as some cancer cells, on contact. When honey comes in contact with a wound, an enzyme called glucose oxidase—a gift from the bees—activates the release of H2O2. There are likely undiscovered interactions that occur when honey is used to treat wounds, but from what we know, medicinal honey can even kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria like MRSA.

Honey is hygroscopic. It pulls water away from an infected wound by osmosis. Dryer wounds heal faster. But there’s more to it: honey also pulls lymph fluid to the wound, making for a balanced healing environment.

It also has a low pH of between 3 and 4, making it acidic. Bacteria thrive in neutral or slightly alkaline environments.

Are There Any Medicinal Benefits?

Yes, there are many. In spite of its sweetness, Acacia honey has a very low sucrose content and a high fructose level, so it is the best choice for diabetics. It is known for its therapeutic qualities because it cleanses the liver, conditions the intestines, and is beneficial for the respiratory system due to antibacterial properties -  another benefit of honey.

What is unique about this honey?

You’ll often see cut honeycomb in the Acacia honey jar since its clarity and pale color allow the comb to be seen through the jar.  Because of its mild flavor, it can easily be blended with other types of honey.

Stachys honey

Well being

The main health benefits for which we revere raw honey today come from the unique blend of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, antioxidants, phytonutrients and other health components that it possesses. The two key beneficial components of truly raw honey are bee pollen and propolis. Bee pollen is a super nutritious compound, containing all the nutrients required by the human body. It is a source of proteins, vitamins, minerals, beneficial fatty acids, carotenoids and bioflavonoids which are antiviral, antibacterial and helpful to cardiovascular health. Propolis also has antibacterial and antiviral qualities, as well as antifungal, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This, along with some of its other characteristics, makes honey highly sought after. The health benefits and uses—both internal and external—of propolis are too numerous to list here.




 

The nutrient content of honey, apart from sugars, is very low, but it has many easily assumable trace minerals and other nutrients. Darker colored honey has more minerals.

Honey is a mixture of sugars and other compounds. With respect to carbohydrates, honey is composed mainly by fructose (about 38.5%) and glucose (about 31.0%), making it similar to the synthetically produced inverted sugar syrup, which is approximately 48% fructose, 47% glucose, and 5% sucrose. Honey's remaining carbohydrates include maltose, sucrose, and other complex carbohydrates. As with all nutritive sweeteners, honey is composed mostly by sugars and contains only trace amounts of vitamins or minerals. Honey also contains tiny amounts of several compounds thought to function as antioxidants, including chrysin, pinobanksinvitamin Ccatalase, and pinocembrin. The specific composition of any batch of honey depends on the flowers available to the bees that produced the honey.

Typical honey composition:

·         Fructose: 38.2%

·         Glucose: 31.3%

·         Maltose: 7.1%

·         Sucrose: 1.3%

·         Water: 17.2%

·         Higher sugars: 1.5%

·         Ash: 0.2%

·         Other/undetermined: 3.2%

 

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 1 tbsp

 

Amount Per Serving

Calories from Fat 0

Calories 64

 

% Daily Values*

Total Fat 0g

0%

 

Saturated Fat 0g

0%

 

Polyunsaturated Fat 0g

 

 

Monounsaturated Fat 0g

 

Cholesterol 0mg

0%

Sodium 1mg

0%

Potassium 11mg

 

Total Carbohydrate 17.3g

6%

 

Dietary Fiber 0g

0%

 

Sugars 17.25g

 

Protein 0.06g

 

 

Vitamin A 0%

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Vitamin C 0%

Calcium 0%

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Iron 0%

 

Honey and health. Honey offers many medicinal uses described in traditional medicine, in addition to just commonly being used as a sweetener. The composition of honey varies depending on the floral source, seasonal and environmental factors, as well as processing techniques used. Honey is rich in phenolic acids and flavonoids, and exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities. It has been hypothesized that honey contributes to the reduction in cardiovascular diseases mainly due to flavonoid-mediated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and antimicrobial activities. The consumption of natural honey has been shown to inhibit oxidation of low density protein, vasodialate blood vessels due to nitric oxide production, decrease platelet aggregation, and exert analgesic and anti-atherogenic effects; each of which may decrease cardiovascular risk. This overview explores the potential therapeutic role of honey in treating cardiovascular diseases, mainly focusing on its potential molecular mechanism(s) underlying flavonoid-mediated actions that may be cardioprotective. However, well designed, double blind, clinical trials on a large scale are needed to confirm therapeutic efficacy of honey in humans.

Honey gets its start as flower nectar, which is collected by bees, naturally broken down into simple sugars and stored in honeycombs. The unique design of the honeycomb, coupled with constant fanning by the bees’ wings, causes evaporation to take place, creating the thick, sweet liquid we know as honey. The color and flavor of honey varies from hive to hive based on the type of flower nectar collected by the bees. For example, honey made from Orange Blossom nectar might be light in color, whereas honey from Avocado or Wildflowers might have a dark amber color.

Beekeepers  — large and small  — harvest honey by collecting the honeycomb frames and scraping off the wax cap that bees make to seal off honey in each cell. Once the caps are removed, the frames are placed in an extractor — a centrifuge that spins the frames, forcing honey out of the comb. The honey is spun to the sides of the extractor, where gravity pulls it to the bottom and it can be collected.

After the honey is extracted, it is strained to remove any remaining pieces of wax or other particles. Some beekeepers and bottlers might heat the honey to make it easier to strain, but this does nothing to alter the liquid’s natural composition. It only makes the straining process easier and more effective. After straining, it’s time to bottle, label and distribute the honey to retail outlets. Whether the container is glass or plastic, or purchased at the grocery store or farmers market, if the ingredient label says pure honey, you can rest assured that nothing was added, from bee to hive to bottle.